MediaWiki API result

This is the HTML representation of the JSON format. HTML is good for debugging, but is unsuitable for application use.

Specify the format parameter to change the output format. To see the non-HTML representation of the JSON format, set format=json.

See the complete documentation, or the API help for more information.

{
    "warnings": {
        "query": {
            "*": "Formatting of continuation data will be changing soon. To continue using the current formatting, use the 'rawcontinue' parameter. To begin using the new format, pass an empty string for 'continue' in the initial query."
        }
    },
    "query-continue": {
        "allpages": {
            "gapcontinue": "Reliable_data_storage"
        }
    },
    "query": {
        "pages": {
            "2047": {
                "pageid": 2047,
                "ns": 0,
                "title": "Reboot Mac running Linux after power failure",
                "revisions": [
                    {
                        "contentformat": "text/x-wiki",
                        "contentmodel": "wikitext",
                        "*": "A Mac Mini will not automatically reboot after a power failure.\n\nmacOS has to option to toggle this option (in System Preferences > Energy Saver > \"Start up automatically after a power failure\" checkbox).\n\nBehind the scenes, this options sets a register in the power management controller (typically the southbridge that acts as the host to the Advanced Configuration and Power Interface (ACPI). macOS set this registers '''after each boot''', since the setting is not persistent across reboots.\n\nSo you need to find the type of southbridge in your Mac, and create a startup script that set the right bit in its device registry.\n\n===Sources===\n\n* [https://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1209576&s=f80775efce190c661738cce69cba97a6&p=7620648 Original findings] by user chirhoxi on Ubuntu forums.\n* [http://xensoft.com/boot-on-power-restore-with-a-mac-mini-when-using-linux/ Good summary] by John Westlund. Parts of that page are copied here, under permission of the CC-BY-SA license.\n\n=== Finding the Southbridge ===\n\nUse <code>lspci</code> to find the southbridge in your Mac.\n\nLikely, the output contains one of:\n\nFor a Mac Mini early 2006 / MacMini1,1 / A1176:\n\n 00:1f.0 ISA bridge: Intel Corporation 82801GBM (ICH7-M) LPC Interface Bridge (rev 02)\n\nFor a Mac Mini early 2009 / MacMini3,1 / A1283:\n\n 00:03.0 ISA bridge: NVIDIA Corporation MCP79 LPC Bridge (rev b2)\n\nFor a Mac Mini early 2010 / MacMini4,1 / A1347:\n\n 00:03.0 ISA bridge: NVIDIA Corporation MCP89 LPC Bridge (rev a2)\n\nFor a Mac Mini Server 2011 (not tested myself):\n\n 00:1f.0 ISA bridge: Intel Corporation HM65 Express Chipset Family LPC Controller (rev 05)\n\n=== Setting the Registers ===\n\nNow that we know what hardware we have, the next step is finding which register determines which mode (off, sleep, powered on) is chosen after a power failure. This is less trivial than it seems. The documentation for south bridges is hard to find, and for those available, not particularly readable.\n\nThankfully others have already determined the correct register for some of the south bridges.\n\nFor PPC Mac Mini (not tested myself):\n\n echo server_mode=1 > /proc/pmu/options\n\nFor Mac Mini with Intel ICH7 south-bridge:\n\n sudo setpci -s 0:1f.0 0xa4.b=0\n\nFor Mac Mini with nVidia MCP79 south-bridge (will likely work on MCP89 too):\n\n sudo setpci -s 00:03.0 0x7b.b=0x19\n\nnVidia no longer makes south bridges, and I have not tested this on a recent Mac mini, so I would love to hear your reports for other south bridges.\n\n=== Setting bits instead of bytes ===\n\nNote that the above codes set the whole byte of the registry.\n\nE.g. <code>setpci -s 0:1f.0 0xa4.b=0</code> sets all 8 bits of 0xa4 to 00000000. In reality, we only care to set the first bit to 0, and don't care about the last 7 bits. The proper code to do this is: <code>setpci -s 0:1f.0 0xa4.b=0:1</code>. This will only set bit zero to zero (0 = value : 1 = mask).\n\nFor the nVidia, I'm not 100% sure which bit is the one to set (I couldn't find documentation for the nVidia MCP79).\n\nIf you want to check the existing value of the registries, use the <code>lspci -vvvxxx</code> argument, like so: <code>lspci -vvvxxx -s 00:03.0</code>\n\n=== Startup Script ===\n\nRemember that these registers need to be set after every boot!\n\nTo create a systemd startup service, create a file `/etc/systemd/system/reboot_on_power_failure.service`:\n\n [Unit]\n Description=Reboot after power failure\n \n [Service]\n Type=oneshot\n # reboot register for Mac Mini with nVidia ISA bridge\n ExecStart=setpci -s 00:03.0 0x7b.b=0x19\n \n [Install]\n WantedBy=sysinit.target\n\nAnd run with <code>systemctl enable --now reboot_on_power_failure.service</code>\n\n[[Category:Hardware]]"
                    }
                ]
            },
            "2069": {
                "pageid": 2069,
                "ns": 0,
                "title": "Redirect Audio from PC to Mac",
                "revisions": [
                    {
                        "contentformat": "text/x-wiki",
                        "contentmodel": "wikitext",
                        "*": "My goal: to simultaneously play the audio of both a PC and my Mac to a single sound output.\n\n== Solution 1: Audio mixer panel ==\n\n[[File:Audio_mixer.png|360px]]\n\nThe most reliable way is to purchase an audio mixer. The advantage is that the delay is likely negligible, and it is easy to adjust the relative volume. The disadvantage is that you can't easily use a Bluetooth headset. Although some mixers have Bluetooth, most have only Bluetooth input (for a microphone), and even those that do, are not capable to sending feedback (like pressing the adjust volume keys on your headphone) back to a computer. So this solution is nice when making a (semi) professional recording, not so much for home use.\n\n== Solution 2: Play through with Quicktime ==\n\n[[File:Audio_playthrough_with_Quicktime.png|360px]]\n\nMy preferred solution is to send the sound output from the PC (using the blue/cyan port on your PC sound card) to the line in input on my Mac, and then redirect the line in to the line out.\n\nA few software solution exists that can do this, including QuickTime, Garageband, several applications by [https://www.rogueamoeba.com/ Rogue Amoeba], and the open source command line tool `sox`. The difference between the different solution is (a) the amount of buffering, which may lead to additional delay, and (b) the option to adjust the volume.\n\nThe QuickTime solution works by:\n\n# Open QuickTime player on MacOS 10.6 or higher.\n# From the File menu, select New Audio Recording.\n# Click the expand triangle (next to the record button) and select ''Line in'' as input/\n# Set the volume using the slider.\n\nThe advantage of this solution is that it is free, and has volume control.\n\nAn often mentioned disadvantage is the additional delay that is added. If this is an issue to you, check one of the other solution mentioned at https://superuser.com/questions/58188/is-there-a-way-to-listen-to-the-input-sound-on-mac-os-x, including GarageBand, sox, and Audio Hijack from Rogue Amoebe. Audio Hijack is very nice, but is priced at $60 (USD) excluding VAT. The former (free and very simple) LineIn application from Rogue Amoebe is no longer supported or working on a modern macOS."
                    }
                ]
            }
        }
    }
}